Thursday, March 5, 2009

Dr. Manhattan's art collection comes from Kansas City

Posted By on Thu, Mar 5, 2009 at 12:37 PM

Dr. Manhattan
  • Dr. Manhattan

Watchmen opens tonight at 11:55. I won't be there, but I'm tempted to go and see what Zach Snyder has done with Alan Moore's graphic novel (even if Moore has cursed the film). When I finally see it, I'll be watching for a couple of sculptures from Kansas City artists.

Warner Bros. leased four sculptures from Paul Dorrell's Leopold Gallery on the heels of the successful installation at H&R Block's world headquarters.

"They were Googling contemporary sculpture, and they came up with Brent Collins," Dorrell says. "They were just blown away. They thought it had a modernistic quality to it that would fit the

film -- especially when you cast the works in bronze.

"The amazing thing about Brent is he sculpts the wooden patterns by

hand, and the wooden patterns are extremely complex. How he does that

is just beyond me."


Dorrell tells me to look for Collins' pieces -- and a couple from Arlie Regier -- in Dr. Manhattan's home.


"Some are in his dining room," Dorrell says. "Some are in his bedroom. Some are in his living room."

After the jump, a look at Dr. Manhattan's sculpture collection.

"Atomic

Flower" by Brent Collins. "All of Brent Collins' sculptures are created

by hand in hardwoods, then cast in bronze," the Leopold's Web site says.

atomicflower_thumb_510x788.jpg
"Hyperbolic Hexagon 2" by Collins. It's another hardwood piece that is available in bronze. It's from a series of sculptures that was featured in Scientific American in 2000.
hyperbolichexagon.jpg

"Hemisphere"

by Arlie Regier. The piece "is composed of roughly 1,000 pieces of

stainless steel," the Leopold's site says. "The Hemisphere is the most

well-known of all Regier designs."

hemisphi_thumb_246x159.jpg
"Floating

Sphere" by Dave and Arlie Regier. "All Regier sculptures are composed

of multiple pieces of recycled stainless steel," the Leopold's site

says. "In the case of this work, roughly 5,000 pieces of stainless were

welded together in creating the work."

floatingsphere.jpg
Collins' work is on display at H&R Block and at the Overland Park Community Center.

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