Monday, June 1, 2009

Was Coors ever really good?

Posted By on Mon, Jun 1, 2009 at 11:45 AM

click to enlarge coorsabandonedbuilding.jpg

I'm not bragging but I've probably seen Smokey and the Bandit 20 times* but it wasn't until reading this article in GQ that I put two and two together and realized that the beer Smokey is transporting -- the point on which the plot begins and turns -- is Coors!

Coors might not have much cache today but that wasn't true in the '60s and '70s. There are pictures of Paul Newman drinking it; Benjamin Braddock drank it in The Graduate; Steve McQueen is rumored to have asked for it on his deathbed.

You might think the Coors of old tasted like liquid gold, but apparently the only thing that's changed about it is people's perception.

And the law. Until 1981 Coors wasn't allowed to be sold west of the Mississippi River. This created a supply/demand issue, and rarity got confused for quality. Now that the beer is as ubiquitous as air, no celebrities are caught drinking it. GQ still recommends it and says the only way to enjoy it is at

near freezing temperatures. Hint: If the beer has to be near-freezing

to be enjoyed it isn't a good beer.

While I'm not going to run out and buy a case of "banquet beer" anytime soon, I do know what I'm drinking next time I watch Smokey and the Bandit.

*Though not since I was 16.

Image via Flickr: Swift Benjamin

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