Thursday, November 5, 2009

Concert Review: Paramore at the Uptown

Posted by on Thu, Nov 5, 2009 at 10:11 AM

With fiery vocals, spunky 'tude and faux-angsty pop-punk sound, singer Hayley Williams, her band boys -- Josh Farro, Jeremy Davis, Zac Farro and Taylor York -- and her famously brightly-dyed hair have been inspiring precious pink-haired teenagers under their now-famous moniker of Paramore since 2004.

Click for more Paramore pics.
  • Click for more Paramore pics.

Tempering the punch of their punk influences with their openly Christian beliefs and down-home Southern charm, Paramore has perfected its own bizarre concoction of religion, angst and pop, creating the perfect punk indulgence for mainstream teenagers.

Musically, Paramore is sheer teen scenester bliss (think Panic! at the Disco and Motion City Soundtrack); but politically, Paramore is candy-coated good clean fun, all wrapped up in a shiny pink-and-black bow that leaves a nation full of faintly (only faintly) rebellious tweens salivating for more.

And so, after successfully duking it out with a nasty case of laryngitis earlier this fall, Williams and the boys are back on the road supporting their newest album, Brand New Eyes--and if last night's show at the Uptown is any indication, they are tearing that shit up.

Kicking off their set with a dark, murky opening number, Paramore tightened the emotional screws before catapulting into their latest single, "Ignorance," with a ferocious force that lasted the duration of their hour-and-change long set.

Cheerful, spunky and ruthlessly energetic, Williams bounced around stage with infectious enthusiasm, belting out morose lyrics with a light-heartedness that would seem hypocritical if it wasn't so damn fun to watch.

click to enlarge Click for more Paramore pics.
  • Click for more Paramore pics.

Hitting high notes with crowd-pleasing tracks like "Misery Business," Paramore's strongest points were consistently their biggest hits, with Williams and her boys juicing pop-punk confections like "CrushCrushCrush" and "Decode" for every last sizzling emo-infused drop.

Though technically pristine and undeniably passionate, Paramore's set was infused with a sense of rehearsed repetition -- between Williams' overblown crowd orchestrations and the band's seamless transitions between songs, gestures and even dance moves, it seemed entirely possible that Paramore's set was a complete copy of their last, totally preserved and transplanted to good old KC. (An awesome, impeccably executed copy, I imagine, but a copy nonetheless.)

Despite the glaring lack of gritty spontaneity in Paramore's on-stage antics, it was clear from the hundreds of glowing cell phones, two-handed heart silhouettes and hand-made "[HEART] U HAYLEY" signs that KC fans were way beyond pleased--they were euphoric.

And with a set filled with undeniably catchy beats and crunchy riffs paired with an essentially flawless execution, who's going to argue with a few hundred gushing Paramore fans?

Hey, not me.

-- Review by Elke Mermis

Set List:

Intro

Ignorance

I Caught Myself

That's What You Get

Looking Up

Emergency

CrushCrushCrush

Turn It Off

Here We Go Again

Careful

Conspiracy

Where the Lines Overlap

Decode

Encore:

Misguided Ghosts (Acoustic)

Misery Business

Brick by Boring Brick

Tags: , , , ,

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

Most Popular Stories

Slideshows

All contents ©2014 Kansas City Pitch LLC
All rights reserved. No part of this service may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of Kansas City Pitch LLC,
except that an individual may download and/or forward articles via email to a reasonable number of recipients for personal, non-commercial purposes.

All contents © 2012 SouthComm, Inc. 210 12th Ave S. Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. (615) 244-7989.
All rights reserved. No part of this service may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of SouthComm, Inc.
except that an individual may download and/or forward articles via email to a reasonable number of recipients for personal, non-commercial purposes.
Website powered by Foundation