Friday, November 8, 2013

The Body delivered face-melting ear candy to an elated crowd last night

Posted by on Fri, Nov 8, 2013 at 12:02 PM

click to enlarge Faultfinder. The disadvantages of not having a real camera and shooting a basement concert. - PHOTO BY PHIL DIAMOND
  • Photo by Phil Diamond
  • Faultfinder. The disadvantages of not having a real camera and shooting a basement concert.

The Body with Bummer and Faultfinder
Mid-East, Kansas City
Thursday, November 7


"I almost hit the dog with the car, and then I almost dropped the amp on it," says Mike Gustafson, the bassist of the newish local metal band Bummer, "but then I just stepped on its foot."

This is the introductory sentence to my evening at a house show out on the east side, in reference to this venue's dog, Killer, who is now burying a gazelle's antlers in a pile of leaves in the corner of the yard. The band bickers rather audibly about who sucks the least at backing out of the driveway, scratching side mirrors on the wall a handful of times before figuring out they can fold them in, and crunching sickly into the fence a second later.

The next band's vehicle hums patiently behind them, ready to pour its own Sunn cabs and drum sets into what we expect to be a crammed basement. There is a fire for the young punks to tend to, and they mill about it, excitedly buzzing for what I'm excitedly buzzing for. We are at this house to watch a band from Portland, Oregon, called the Body, and we love the Body.

The Body is a band I've reviewed a handful of times elsewhere, a band that I look forward to more than any other touring act that frequently hits KC, and I manage to find the lead singer and guitarist Chip King standing alone. I ask him if he has anything to say about KC, and he says, simply, "We love it."

I tell him I wrote a review of their new album, Christs and Redeemers, out on Thrill Jockey, and talk about a lackluster Pitchfork review they just had.

"We haven't seen the Pitchfork review," King says. "Thrill Jockey sent us sort of an apology for what they said about it, but we don't really worry about Pitchfork."

I tell him that even though I don't make metal music, they're still my favorite band.

"I don't think we make metal either, really," he says. I tell him to keep up the great work and bow out as gracefully as I can, embarrassed to find myself actually beaming in the dark, not hearing a word that one of the young punks is now saying to me.

If a visit from the Body has brought out a horde of punk kids in the past, it has also definitely brought out the local bands, and I'm surprised to find that Thursday night's show is going to be only a three-band bill. This puts locals Bummer and Faultfinder in the strange position of opening for a band that will outshine them without disappearing into the six-band fog. I will remember their sets even if I get drunk. Don Beasley, one of Faultfinder's guitarists, mentions that this is the band's fifth time opening for the Body.

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