Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Tasting wine the Riedel way

Posted By on Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 10:30 AM

CIMG1369.JPG


I stopped by the American Restaurant last night to hear George Riedel talk about his famous glassware. Don't worry -- I'm not going bourgeois on you. But I was interested to see if Riedel glass really does make a difference with wine.

The conclusion: yes, but at a price. My price was having to listen to the Austrian Riedel dress down many of the 70 or so wine aficionados in the room. I had flashbacks to Catholic School and teachers yelling at me to sit up straight. Half the time, Riedel seemed to be joking around, but the other half he just seemed like a jerk, especially when calling out two waiters who had been whispering to each other.

Still, Riedel is a born showman. He put plastic glasses next to his hand-blown glasses and asked people to taste from both and see if they noticed a difference, which, of course, they did. "What I am doing is opening your eyes," he said, obviously excited to see people's reactions.

To his credit, every wine I tasted out of a Riedel glass came across differently and felt more three-dimensional than wine sipped from a normal glass. But because Riedel was coaching us the entire time on what to look for, I can't rule out the placebo effect.

What these glasses no doubt do is cover the nose better than a

normal glass, bringing more smell into each sip and, thus, more flavor.

Riedel even joked that when he goes to a restaurant and they don't

serve his glasses, he'll ask for a brandy snifter to get the same

effect.

There is no denying that Riedel glasses are beautiful to look

at. They're almost worth buying just to hold and examine in detail because the glass itself is so delicate and fine. It's no wonder some are displayed in the Museum of Modern Art. But George

Riedel doesn't care for that. "If you want to insult me, say my glasses

are pretty," he chastened his audience. "They're meant to be instruments." 

Expensive instruments. Riedel was showing off his

sommeliers series of glasses, each of which retails for more than $100. (Check eBay, where sellers often offer good deals on Riedel.)

"When people ask me how much should I pay for a wineglass, I tell them: how ever much you pay for wine. If you drink a $50 bottle, you need a

$50 glass. The pricing should be one to one."

Since my current drink

choices tend toward the price of the plastic cup, that last point was lost on me. But the tasting did make me believe if I ever were to drink

wines in the rarefied three-figure price range, a Riedel glass wouldn't

be such a bad investment.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

Most Popular Stories

Slideshows

All contents ©2014 Kansas City Pitch LLC
All rights reserved. No part of this service may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of Kansas City Pitch LLC,
except that an individual may download and/or forward articles via email to a reasonable number of recipients for personal, non-commercial purposes.

All contents © 2012 SouthComm, Inc. 210 12th Ave S. Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. (615) 244-7989.
All rights reserved. No part of this service may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of SouthComm, Inc.
except that an individual may download and/or forward articles via email to a reasonable number of recipients for personal, non-commercial purposes.
Website powered by Foundation