Friday, August 14, 2009

This week's "Best of Fat City"...a novel approach

Posted By on Fri, Aug 14, 2009 at 5:26 PM

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Since one of this week's Top Stories from the Fat City is our list of the Top Ten Cafes to write a Novel, we thought it was time to take a more literary approach to this weekly list of potent past posts. Some critics of blogging insist that this mode of internet communication is driving readers away from reading the classics, from Aristotle to Zora Neale Hurston, but that's not true in Fat City, where every post is carefully translated from ancient Greek texts. Including this one. But back to the list:

 Jonathan Bender wrote about the myth and legend of New York bagels without, shockingly, making a single reference to the Sharon Kahn mystery novel, Fax Me A Bagel: A Novel Introducing Ruby, the Rabbi's Wife.

We met the new young chef at the InterContinental Hotel's Oak Room, Kyle Baker, who is not the same Kyle Baker who creates graphic novels (the fancier version of comic boooks, sort of).

We thought of famous novelists who liked to write novels in famous cafes: Ernest Hemingway, who lived in Kansas City for a few minutes, Samuel Becket, James Joyce, and this generation's Whitney Terrell (who wrote to tell us he has a fondness for Kansas City's Savoy Grill). Thus, we made a list of the Top Ten Cafes to write a Novel, not realizing that one of the chosen ten, Mike's Tavern, was currently not open, thus not welcoming novelists. The most recent novel to feature a restaurant in Kansas City may be chef Lou Jane Temple's first culinary mystery, Death by Rhubarb, which was set in a fictional 39th Street restaurant called Cafe Heaven -- unabashedly inspired by Temple's own 39th Street bistro, Cafe Lulu.

We explained that the Green Dirt Farm in Weston, Missouri received honors -- including a gold medal -- at the American Cheese Society Competition in Austin, Texas. The staff at the Green Dirt Farm may not be quite as colorful as the characters in the hilarious Stella Gibbons novel Cold Comfort Farm (well, Tony Glancevski might be), but there's a book there somewhere. 

And last, but not least, just in time for a sultry weekend, the Record Bar's lovely mixologist Janelle Mead showed us how to make a cocktail featuring elderflower liqueur. In case you're wondering if there was ever a mystery novel about a bartender, yes there is: What Goes Around Comes Around: A Mystery Novel Featuring Bartender Brian McNulty by Con Lehane.

 

 

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