Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Do we need a law to stop us from eating fast food?

Posted By on Tue, Jan 4, 2011 at 10:45 AM

click to enlarge Who should be responsible for curbing your drive for fast food?
  • Who should be responsible for curbing your drive for fast food?

Nobody likes to be told to eat their vegetables. But what if somebody ordered you not to eat those fries?

The debate over personal responsibility versus government regulation when it comes to fast-food choices is looking like the next big health kerfuffle. America has finally looked in the rearview mirror and is wondering if the Burger King wrapper in the back is to blame for why it appears larger. But who decides what happens to our diets?

Right or wrong, some have called for the government to step in and prevent us from eating the entire dollar menu. If you can't teach moderation, then legislate it. Last week, The Detroit News reported that the Physicians Committee for Responsible

Medicine asked Detroit Mayor Dave Bing to issue a moratorium on new

fast-food restaurants, citing concerns over restaurant density and the rate of heart attacks in the city. (Detroit claims the fourth-highest rate in the nation.) Bing, however, has no interest in a moratorium.

And last night, The Daily Show looked at the move in San Francisco to ban toys in children's fast-food combo meals that don't meet the new nutritional requirements set forth by the city. At the heart of the piece on Happy Meals was the question of whether the city has the right to regulate the interests of a private company or this is an issue best left to parents.  

Where does your personal right to hit the drive-through end (or does it?), and where does the government's effort to prevent you from outgrowing your driver's seat begin?

[Image via Flickr: gadgetdude]

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