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Comment Archives: stories: Music: Bonus Tracks

Re: “Kredulous

Very Nice CD, I just saw Kred Perform at "The Eclipse" Nightclub in Gladstone! Amazing performance! So in sync with each other. Lots of energy! I definitely recommend seeing this kid live! Go Get the Album too!

Posted by Marcel on 09/24/2010 at 2:50 AM

Re: “Kredulous

I STRONGLY DISAGREE WITH THIS REVIEW..SOLID PIECE.

Posted by Lawrence on 09/22/2010 at 3:19 PM

Re: “Kredulous

I STRONGLY DISAGREE WITH THIS REVIEW..SOLID PIECE.

Posted by Lawrence on 09/22/2010 at 12:19 PM

Re: “Crossroads Music Fest

Yay Bill. Yay Ian.

Posted by Ryan Donegan on 09/09/2010 at 7:48 PM

Re: “Crossroads Music Fest

Yay Bill. Yay Ian.

Posted by Ryan Donegan on 09/09/2010 at 4:48 PM

Re: “Crossroads Music Fest

The Crossroads Music Fest is my favorite day of the year in Kansas City. So much good music and everybody's out and having a great time. Do it.

Posted by Bob Asher on 09/08/2010 at 7:55 PM

Re: “Crossroads Music Fest

The Crossroads Music Fest is my favorite day of the year in Kansas City. So much good music and everybody's out and having a great time. Do it.

Posted by Bob Asher on 09/08/2010 at 4:55 PM

Re: “Power Play

atom hey hey hey iv been thnking about you when you get this give me a call 641 895 4645

Posted by JUSTINA on 06/07/2010 at 10:31 PM

Re: “Power Play

atom hey hey hey iv been thnking about you when you get this give me a call 641 895 4645

Posted by JUSTINA on 06/07/2010 at 7:31 PM

Re: “Get Back, Satan!

Really, I mean honestly? Do you really spend your life depicting what other people sing about? I love all these bands! You are such a hater. People like you are the ones who cause people to write and sing about hating their fucking lives! You need to obviously find something else to do! Korn is the best band alive. Pretty Rad Jon has Bundy�s Bug. I think it�s very disturbing that you choose to criticize these people. You are probably one of those closet homosexuals. Maybe even a sick twisted person who loves to do nasty things. Or you�re just a Christian that ruins what Jesus and God really want for this world. The last time I checked Jesus died on the cross for us to make our own decisions. So I would advise you to find better ways to fulfill the empty spot you have in your life. Good Day



Sincerely Yours,
Kaila ☮!

Posted by Kaila on 02/24/2010 at 3:11 PM

Re: “Get Back, Satan!

Really, I mean honestly? Do you really spend your life depicting what other people sing about? I love all these bands! You are such a hater. People like you are the ones who cause people to write and sing about hating their fucking lives! You need to obviously find something else to do! Korn is the best band alive. Pretty Rad Jon has Bundy’s Bug. I think it’s very disturbing that you choose to criticize these people. You are probably one of those closet homosexuals. Maybe even a sick twisted person who loves to do nasty things. Or you’re just a Christian that ruins what Jesus and God really want for this world. The last time I checked Jesus died on the cross for us to make our own decisions. So I would advise you to find better ways to fulfill the empty spot you have in your life. Good Day Sincerely Yours, Kaila ☮!

Posted by Kaila on 02/24/2010 at 12:11 PM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

You did, obviously, or you wouldn't have commented twice.

Posted by Kevin on 10/19/2009 at 7:56 PM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

You did, obviously, or you wouldn't have commented twice.

Posted by Kevin on 10/19/2009 at 4:56 PM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

Seriously?


#
OK... first off... I don't apologize for what's being said because you SHOULD hear it from someone.

This has to be the most disorientating, unfocused, ignorant display of writing I've EVER seen. I mean, you're supposed to review a record and the only thing you focus on is basically "hating" on the vocalist. You didn't write ANYTHING about beats or overall concepts and how they fit with his style, and you DEFINITELY didn't give any compelling arguments for your criticisms. You basically just slandered a man's name all throughout one paragraph (albeit using big words you probably got from the thesaurus which actually GLORIFIED that same man), and gave basically no respect to someone who probably works harder than YOU on an everyday basis just to get his name out. You have to be the worst disgrace to journalism and reviews I've ever seen. I listened to the album. Steddy comes with some great delivery, and those tracks where you said extra syllables were added on were more for effect and evoking the emotion of the track than anything else. It wasn't done horribly. There are plenty of artists who can't even MAKE a decent track, let alone get someone to listen and review it. Whoever put this album on your desk for review should have fired you for this low brow attempt at slander and hate. Maybe you hold a grudge with Steddy, I don't know, but there were other people involved in this project whom you COMPLETELY NEGLECTED to mention. Ben Bounce, who has started getting a lot of recognition throughout the Midwest, East Coast and Front Range, MADE ALL OF THE BEATS FOR THIS LP. Apparently, you must have had all the a capella versions, because NOT ONCE did you mention HIM or his BEAT QUALITY and HOW IT FIT WITH THE TRACKS AS PRESENTED BY STEDDY P. You did NO RESEARCH on who they really are and what they bring, you gave NO EXPLANATIONS as to why you said what you said, and you showed NO REMORSE for basically slandering one man's name through your publication while basically ignoring another major player entirely. And then comparing them to MAINSTREAM famous people who have done their share and paid dues and are now well known throughout the country for more than just music now... Steddy P and Ben Bounce are not MAINSTREAM. It's called IndyGround for a reason, or did you not even take time to notice the printed cover with all the words so carefully laid out for you in plain English? If you're not willing to review someone for their art, and incorporate the whole sound (lyrics AND beats), then you obviously don't know what hip-hop is and should DEFINITELY not be reviewing it. Personally, I think you should go back to Desk work, because Artist Reviews are NOT YOUR THING. Stick to what YOU know, because I can tell you this... IT'S NOT HIP-HOP.

And now for a REAL review of Steddy P's LP "Style Like Mind" Produced by Ben Bounce for Peacetable Music.From the intro to the LP, aptly named "Intro", you can tell you're listening to the gritty sounds of Ben Bounce (["i-Disciple:The Compass" - 2008] and ["1221:Inches" - 2009]). It also helps when he tells you through sample form that he is joining Steddy P on this venture. With his innovative cuts and scratches consistantly going through the track, you can tell he and Steddy are really "Ready with the one-two checkah".

Steddy makes his entrance on the second track "Won't Lay Down", in which Steddy and the sample both scream "STAND UP!", a popular theme throughout hip-hop music. Steddy however, does not balk at throwing his words around like a true professional, and even states in the tracks very first verse "if you wanna be successful, better come with the raw-est". And as a slight ode to backpack hip-hop, or the Dusty Foot Philosophers who used to shuck mixtapes from their trunks, Steddy gives a hint as to how much effort and time he puts into his music, stating "my white tees still fit from middle school". I just hope they look as clean as his delivery.

Next, Steddy and Bounce bring you a more thought provoking track in "No Matter How", in which Steddy gives you a slight insight into himself and his own mindstate. He gives you a kind of softer feel during the chorus when he states that he's "trying to make this music work... take it on the road/ I'm tryin' to make these wings work... fly around the globe...". The sample behind helps to draw out that feeling echoing "No Matter How", and as if in response, with every verse Steddy puts his mind to work and basically vocalizes in rhyme form the "Here's How".

The title track "Style Like Mind" begins with a kind of caution to the average hip-hop listener, with Steddy stating that "Thanks to Mr. Ben Bounce I can be as weird as I wanna be.". The flow gets quicker while the beat is a little slower, making for a great mixture of the underground sound since lost to the dusty crates of DJ's and the annuls of the old school. And as if to bring you back to the days, Steddy uses his play on LL Cool J's line for which the album is titled to say that you won't hear this kind of hip-hop done anywhere else. I do have to admit that Ben Bounce did allow Steddy to go a little nuts on this track, but it works for Steddy's "Style Like Mind".

In "Miss You", Steddy and Ben go deeper and more loving, with Steddy telling a significant other that he enjoys her and her support of his music, but hates the fighting that it causes. Consistantly begging her to "Calm down... Please Please Please" because no matter what the fight is about he still must travel "so I can eat emcees". It is apparent on this track that he's not about to eat just yet though, because as the track plays he tells a story about the relationship that they share and how much it bothers both of them to argue and fight all the time. Being a musician, I completely understand where Steddy and Bounce came from with this track, because doing shows is hard enough without having to deal with a partner who allows the petty things to continue to get to them. And as if to not continue the fight, he tells her not to "worry about that L word, just know I miss you." He changes his tune later on, but you'll have to listen to hear that.

The "Indylude" gives you n insight into who you're listening to, and with whom they represent. Check out the track yourself and see if you have any of them in your music library.

Steddy and Bounce get right back into it with "Without You", and as the horns dig in deep a la Bounce, you hear Steddy reaching another level of his "Style Like Mind". One of my favorite lines is one that I completely agree with - "there's a lot of good music, a lot of it is BORING". I can tell you that THIS is not what he was talking about. Their love of hip-hop shows blatantly through the track, and the Erykah Badu sample is lively above the droning horns while the synth adds a more conclusive melody to the track. It also helps that Steddy adds his own soul to the music, singing "I don't know what I'd do without you Hip-Hop".

"Steddy Persistance" is just pure madness. Can I say that again? "Steddy Persistance" is just PURE MADNESS. If you don't like this track, you must not have ears. I won't even review it. I'll leave you to review it at your own leisure. What I will say is that Steddy P and Ben Bounce should have called that track "Evil Genius".

A success story named "Maverick" ensues after, and through 2 minutes and 30 seconds, Steddy P goes through a fall and rise of a man who, if you pay attention to the track, could also live inside each and every one of us. The riding beat really gives Steddy something to go on, and while the first verse sounds a little sad over the beat, Steddy turns it around and makes it sound joyous. I guarantee that 2:31 was not time wasted... I only wish Maverick would have had a longer lifetime on the album.

Release is another high point, and as I won't go to deep, I will say that Indyground and Peacetable really did a number on the number 11 for me. And that's in the greatest way.

"Kenneth Arnold" brings more craziness to your deck, and it's almost like Steddy has become his own alter ego at times. This is the point you start to think maybe Steddy P is clinically schizophrenic, but with a "Style Like Mind" can you blame him? Here, Steddy uses a lot of quips and quibbles and really flexes his lyrical muscle to bring a more comical experience to the mic. "Look at the flying saucer!"

As for the rest of the album, Steddy uses some style switches and guest appearances from his own label Indyground, and you can tell he and Ben Bounce took their time to ensure that this was not just another throw away album so many artists make and put out just to have product on store shelves. For any track I haven't reviewed, I hope that gives you all the more incentive to purchase your own copy of "Steddy P: Style Like Mind" for yourself. If you're a fan of hip-hop, this is definitely an album for the collection.
Comment by Kevin from Colorado Springs on Oct 16th, 2009, 14:04 pm

Posted by ? on 10/17/2009 at 12:31 AM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

Really? You expect people to read that?


OK... first off... I don't apologize for what's being said because you SHOULD hear it from someone.

This has to be the most disorientating, unfocused, ignorant display of writing I've EVER seen. I mean, you're supposed to review a record and the only thing you focus on is basically "hating" on the vocalist. You didn't write ANYTHING about beats or overall concepts and how they fit with his style, and you DEFINITELY didn't give any compelling arguments for your criticisms. You basically just slandered a man's name all throughout one paragraph (albeit using big words you probably got from the thesaurus which actually GLORIFIED that same man), and gave basically no respect to someone who probably works harder than YOU on an everyday basis just to get his name out. You have to be the worst disgrace to journalism and reviews I've ever seen. I listened to the album. Steddy comes with some great delivery, and those tracks where you said extra syllables were added on were more for effect and evoking the emotion of the track than anything else. It wasn't done horribly. There are plenty of artists who can't even MAKE a decent track, let alone get someone to listen and review it. Whoever put this album on your desk for review should have fired you for this low brow attempt at slander and hate. Maybe you hold a grudge with Steddy, I don't know, but there were other people involved in this project whom you COMPLETELY NEGLECTED to mention. Ben Bounce, who has started getting a lot of recognition throughout the Midwest, East Coast and Front Range, MADE ALL OF THE BEATS FOR THIS LP. Apparently, you must have had all the a capella versions, because NOT ONCE did you mention HIM or his BEAT QUALITY and HOW IT FIT WITH THE TRACKS AS PRESENTED BY STEDDY P. You did NO RESEARCH on who they really are and what they bring, you gave NO EXPLANATIONS as to why you said what you said, and you showed NO REMORSE for basically slandering one man's name through your publication while basically ignoring another major player entirely. And then comparing them to MAINSTREAM famous people who have done their share and paid dues and are now well known throughout the country for more than just music now... Steddy P and Ben Bounce are not MAINSTREAM. It's called IndyGround for a reason, or did you not even take time to notice the printed cover with all the words so carefully laid out for you in plain English? If you're not willing to review someone for their art, and incorporate the whole sound (lyrics AND beats), then you obviously don't know what hip-hop is and should DEFINITELY not be reviewing it. Personally, I think you should go back to Desk work, because Artist Reviews are NOT YOUR THING. Stick to what YOU know, because I can tell you this... IT'S NOT HIP-HOP.

And now for a REAL review of Steddy P's LP "Style Like Mind" Produced by Ben Bounce for Peacetable Music.From the intro to the LP, aptly named "Intro", you can tell you're listening to the gritty sounds of Ben Bounce (["i-Disciple:The Compass" - 2008] and ["1221:Inches" - 2009]). It also helps when he tells you through sample form that he is joining Steddy P on this venture. With his innovative cuts and scratches consistantly going through the track, you can tell he and Steddy are really "Ready with the one-two checkah".

Steddy makes his entrance on the second track "Won't Lay Down", in which Steddy and the sample both scream "STAND UP!", a popular theme throughout hip-hop music. Steddy however, does not balk at throwing his words around like a true professional, and even states in the tracks very first verse "if you wanna be successful, better come with the raw-est". And as a slight ode to backpack hip-hop, or the Dusty Foot Philosophers who used to shuck mixtapes from their trunks, Steddy gives a hint as to how much effort and time he puts into his music, stating "my white tees still fit from middle school". I just hope they look as clean as his delivery.

Next, Steddy and Bounce bring you a more thought provoking track in "No Matter How", in which Steddy gives you a slight insight into himself and his own mindstate. He gives you a kind of softer feel during the chorus when he states that he's "trying to make this music work... take it on the road/ I'm tryin' to make these wings work... fly around the globe...". The sample behind helps to draw out that feeling echoing "No Matter How", and as if in response, with every verse Steddy puts his mind to work and basically vocalizes in rhyme form the "Here's How".

The title track "Style Like Mind" begins with a kind of caution to the average hip-hop listener, with Steddy stating that "Thanks to Mr. Ben Bounce I can be as weird as I wanna be.". The flow gets quicker while the beat is a little slower, making for a great mixture of the underground sound since lost to the dusty crates of DJ's and the annuls of the old school. And as if to bring you back to the days, Steddy uses his play on LL Cool J's line for which the album is titled to say that you won't hear this kind of hip-hop done anywhere else. I do have to admit that Ben Bounce did allow Steddy to go a little nuts on this track, but it works for Steddy's "Style Like Mind".

In "Miss You", Steddy and Ben go deeper and more loving, with Steddy telling a significant other that he enjoys her and her support of his music, but hates the fighting that it causes. Consistantly begging her to "Calm down... Please Please Please" because no matter what the fight is about he still must travel "so I can eat emcees". It is apparent on this track that he's not about to eat just yet though, because as the track plays he tells a story about the relationship that they share and how much it bothers both of them to argue and fight all the time. Being a musician, I completely understand where Steddy and Bounce came from with this track, because doing shows is hard enough without having to deal with a partner who allows the petty things to continue to get to them. And as if to not continue the fight, he tells her not to "worry about that L word, just know I miss you." He changes his tune later on, but you'll have to listen to hear that.

The "Indylude" gives you n insight into who you're listening to, and with whom they represent. Check out the track yourself and see if you have any of them in your music library.

Steddy and Bounce get right back into it with "Without You", and as the horns dig in deep a la Bounce, you hear Steddy reaching another level of his "Style Like Mind". One of my favorite lines is one that I completely agree with - "there's a lot of good music, a lot of it is BORING". I can tell you that THIS is not what he was talking about. Their love of hip-hop shows blatantly through the track, and the Erykah Badu sample is lively above the droning horns while the synth adds a more conclusive melody to the track. It also helps that Steddy adds his own soul to the music, singing "I don't know what I'd do without you Hip-Hop".

"Steddy Persistance" is just pure madness. Can I say that again? "Steddy Persistance" is just PURE MADNESS. If you don't like this track, you must not have ears. I won't even review it. I'll leave you to review it at your own leisure. What I will say is that Steddy P and Ben Bounce should have called that track "Evil Genius".

A success story named "Maverick" ensues after, and through 2 minutes and 30 seconds, Steddy P goes through a fall and rise of a man who, if you pay attention to the track, could also live inside each and every one of us. The riding beat really gives Steddy something to go on, and while the first verse sounds a little sad over the beat, Steddy turns it around and makes it sound joyous. I guarantee that 2:31 was not time wasted... I only wish Maverick would have had a longer lifetime on the album.

Release is another high point, and as I won't go to deep, I will say that Indyground and Peacetable really did a number on the number 11 for me. And that's in the greatest way.

"Kenneth Arnold" brings more craziness to your deck, and it's almost like Steddy has become his own alter ego at times. This is the point you start to think maybe Steddy P is clinically schizophrenic, but with a "Style Like Mind" can you blame him? Here, Steddy uses a lot of quips and quibbles and really flexes his lyrical muscle to bring a more comical experience to the mic. "Look at the flying saucer!"

As for the rest of the album, Steddy uses some style switches and guest appearances from his own label Indyground, and you can tell he and Ben Bounce took their time to ensure that this was not just another throw away album so many artists make and put out just to have product on store shelves. For any track I haven't reviewed, I hope that gives you all the more incentive to purchase your own copy of "Steddy P: Style Like Mind" for yourself. If you're a fan of hip-hop, this is definitely an album for the collection.
Comment by Kevin from Colorado Springs on Oct 16th, 2009, 14:04 pm

Posted by ? on 10/17/2009 at 12:20 AM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

Seriously? # OK... first off... I don't apologize for what's being said because you SHOULD hear it from someone. This has to be the most disorientating, unfocused, ignorant display of writing I've EVER seen. I mean, you're supposed to review a record and the only thing you focus on is basically "hating" on the vocalist. You didn't write ANYTHING about beats or overall concepts and how they fit with his style, and you DEFINITELY didn't give any compelling arguments for your criticisms. You basically just slandered a man's name all throughout one paragraph (albeit using big words you probably got from the thesaurus which actually GLORIFIED that same man), and gave basically no respect to someone who probably works harder than YOU on an everyday basis just to get his name out. You have to be the worst disgrace to journalism and reviews I've ever seen. I listened to the album. Steddy comes with some great delivery, and those tracks where you said extra syllables were added on were more for effect and evoking the emotion of the track than anything else. It wasn't done horribly. There are plenty of artists who can't even MAKE a decent track, let alone get someone to listen and review it. Whoever put this album on your desk for review should have fired you for this low brow attempt at slander and hate. Maybe you hold a grudge with Steddy, I don't know, but there were other people involved in this project whom you COMPLETELY NEGLECTED to mention. Ben Bounce, who has started getting a lot of recognition throughout the Midwest, East Coast and Front Range, MADE ALL OF THE BEATS FOR THIS LP. Apparently, you must have had all the a capella versions, because NOT ONCE did you mention HIM or his BEAT QUALITY and HOW IT FIT WITH THE TRACKS AS PRESENTED BY STEDDY P. You did NO RESEARCH on who they really are and what they bring, you gave NO EXPLANATIONS as to why you said what you said, and you showed NO REMORSE for basically slandering one man's name through your publication while basically ignoring another major player entirely. And then comparing them to MAINSTREAM famous people who have done their share and paid dues and are now well known throughout the country for more than just music now... Steddy P and Ben Bounce are not MAINSTREAM. It's called IndyGround for a reason, or did you not even take time to notice the printed cover with all the words so carefully laid out for you in plain English? If you're not willing to review someone for their art, and incorporate the whole sound (lyrics AND beats), then you obviously don't know what hip-hop is and should DEFINITELY not be reviewing it. Personally, I think you should go back to Desk work, because Artist Reviews are NOT YOUR THING. Stick to what YOU know, because I can tell you this... IT'S NOT HIP-HOP. And now for a REAL review of Steddy P's LP "Style Like Mind" Produced by Ben Bounce for Peacetable Music.From the intro to the LP, aptly named "Intro", you can tell you're listening to the gritty sounds of Ben Bounce (["i-Disciple:The Compass" - 2008] and ["1221:Inches" - 2009]). It also helps when he tells you through sample form that he is joining Steddy P on this venture. With his innovative cuts and scratches consistantly going through the track, you can tell he and Steddy are really "Ready with the one-two checkah". Steddy makes his entrance on the second track "Won't Lay Down", in which Steddy and the sample both scream "STAND UP!", a popular theme throughout hip-hop music. Steddy however, does not balk at throwing his words around like a true professional, and even states in the tracks very first verse "if you wanna be successful, better come with the raw-est". And as a slight ode to backpack hip-hop, or the Dusty Foot Philosophers who used to shuck mixtapes from their trunks, Steddy gives a hint as to how much effort and time he puts into his music, stating "my white tees still fit from middle school". I just hope they look as clean as his delivery. Next, Steddy and Bounce bring you a more thought provoking track in "No Matter How", in which Steddy gives you a slight insight into himself and his own mindstate. He gives you a kind of softer feel during the chorus when he states that he's "trying to make this music work... take it on the road/ I'm tryin' to make these wings work... fly around the globe...". The sample behind helps to draw out that feeling echoing "No Matter How", and as if in response, with every verse Steddy puts his mind to work and basically vocalizes in rhyme form the "Here's How". The title track "Style Like Mind" begins with a kind of caution to the average hip-hop listener, with Steddy stating that "Thanks to Mr. Ben Bounce I can be as weird as I wanna be.". The flow gets quicker while the beat is a little slower, making for a great mixture of the underground sound since lost to the dusty crates of DJ's and the annuls of the old school. And as if to bring you back to the days, Steddy uses his play on LL Cool J's line for which the album is titled to say that you won't hear this kind of hip-hop done anywhere else. I do have to admit that Ben Bounce did allow Steddy to go a little nuts on this track, but it works for Steddy's "Style Like Mind". In "Miss You", Steddy and Ben go deeper and more loving, with Steddy telling a significant other that he enjoys her and her support of his music, but hates the fighting that it causes. Consistantly begging her to "Calm down... Please Please Please" because no matter what the fight is about he still must travel "so I can eat emcees". It is apparent on this track that he's not about to eat just yet though, because as the track plays he tells a story about the relationship that they share and how much it bothers both of them to argue and fight all the time. Being a musician, I completely understand where Steddy and Bounce came from with this track, because doing shows is hard enough without having to deal with a partner who allows the petty things to continue to get to them. And as if to not continue the fight, he tells her not to "worry about that L word, just know I miss you." He changes his tune later on, but you'll have to listen to hear that. The "Indylude" gives you n insight into who you're listening to, and with whom they represent. Check out the track yourself and see if you have any of them in your music library. Steddy and Bounce get right back into it with "Without You", and as the horns dig in deep a la Bounce, you hear Steddy reaching another level of his "Style Like Mind". One of my favorite lines is one that I completely agree with - "there's a lot of good music, a lot of it is BORING". I can tell you that THIS is not what he was talking about. Their love of hip-hop shows blatantly through the track, and the Erykah Badu sample is lively above the droning horns while the synth adds a more conclusive melody to the track. It also helps that Steddy adds his own soul to the music, singing "I don't know what I'd do without you Hip-Hop". "Steddy Persistance" is just pure madness. Can I say that again? "Steddy Persistance" is just PURE MADNESS. If you don't like this track, you must not have ears. I won't even review it. I'll leave you to review it at your own leisure. What I will say is that Steddy P and Ben Bounce should have called that track "Evil Genius". A success story named "Maverick" ensues after, and through 2 minutes and 30 seconds, Steddy P goes through a fall and rise of a man who, if you pay attention to the track, could also live inside each and every one of us. The riding beat really gives Steddy something to go on, and while the first verse sounds a little sad over the beat, Steddy turns it around and makes it sound joyous. I guarantee that 2:31 was not time wasted... I only wish Maverick would have had a longer lifetime on the album. Release is another high point, and as I won't go to deep, I will say that Indyground and Peacetable really did a number on the number 11 for me. And that's in the greatest way. "Kenneth Arnold" brings more craziness to your deck, and it's almost like Steddy has become his own alter ego at times. This is the point you start to think maybe Steddy P is clinically schizophrenic, but with a "Style Like Mind" can you blame him? Here, Steddy uses a lot of quips and quibbles and really flexes his lyrical muscle to bring a more comical experience to the mic. "Look at the flying saucer!" As for the rest of the album, Steddy uses some style switches and guest appearances from his own label Indyground, and you can tell he and Ben Bounce took their time to ensure that this was not just another throw away album so many artists make and put out just to have product on store shelves. For any track I haven't reviewed, I hope that gives you all the more incentive to purchase your own copy of "Steddy P: Style Like Mind" for yourself. If you're a fan of hip-hop, this is definitely an album for the collection. Comment by Kevin from Colorado Springs on Oct 16th, 2009, 14:04 pm

Posted by ? on 10/16/2009 at 9:31 PM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

Really? You expect people to read that? OK... first off... I don't apologize for what's being said because you SHOULD hear it from someone. This has to be the most disorientating, unfocused, ignorant display of writing I've EVER seen. I mean, you're supposed to review a record and the only thing you focus on is basically "hating" on the vocalist. You didn't write ANYTHING about beats or overall concepts and how they fit with his style, and you DEFINITELY didn't give any compelling arguments for your criticisms. You basically just slandered a man's name all throughout one paragraph (albeit using big words you probably got from the thesaurus which actually GLORIFIED that same man), and gave basically no respect to someone who probably works harder than YOU on an everyday basis just to get his name out. You have to be the worst disgrace to journalism and reviews I've ever seen. I listened to the album. Steddy comes with some great delivery, and those tracks where you said extra syllables were added on were more for effect and evoking the emotion of the track than anything else. It wasn't done horribly. There are plenty of artists who can't even MAKE a decent track, let alone get someone to listen and review it. Whoever put this album on your desk for review should have fired you for this low brow attempt at slander and hate. Maybe you hold a grudge with Steddy, I don't know, but there were other people involved in this project whom you COMPLETELY NEGLECTED to mention. Ben Bounce, who has started getting a lot of recognition throughout the Midwest, East Coast and Front Range, MADE ALL OF THE BEATS FOR THIS LP. Apparently, you must have had all the a capella versions, because NOT ONCE did you mention HIM or his BEAT QUALITY and HOW IT FIT WITH THE TRACKS AS PRESENTED BY STEDDY P. You did NO RESEARCH on who they really are and what they bring, you gave NO EXPLANATIONS as to why you said what you said, and you showed NO REMORSE for basically slandering one man's name through your publication while basically ignoring another major player entirely. And then comparing them to MAINSTREAM famous people who have done their share and paid dues and are now well known throughout the country for more than just music now... Steddy P and Ben Bounce are not MAINSTREAM. It's called IndyGround for a reason, or did you not even take time to notice the printed cover with all the words so carefully laid out for you in plain English? If you're not willing to review someone for their art, and incorporate the whole sound (lyrics AND beats), then you obviously don't know what hip-hop is and should DEFINITELY not be reviewing it. Personally, I think you should go back to Desk work, because Artist Reviews are NOT YOUR THING. Stick to what YOU know, because I can tell you this... IT'S NOT HIP-HOP. And now for a REAL review of Steddy P's LP "Style Like Mind" Produced by Ben Bounce for Peacetable Music.From the intro to the LP, aptly named "Intro", you can tell you're listening to the gritty sounds of Ben Bounce (["i-Disciple:The Compass" - 2008] and ["1221:Inches" - 2009]). It also helps when he tells you through sample form that he is joining Steddy P on this venture. With his innovative cuts and scratches consistantly going through the track, you can tell he and Steddy are really "Ready with the one-two checkah". Steddy makes his entrance on the second track "Won't Lay Down", in which Steddy and the sample both scream "STAND UP!", a popular theme throughout hip-hop music. Steddy however, does not balk at throwing his words around like a true professional, and even states in the tracks very first verse "if you wanna be successful, better come with the raw-est". And as a slight ode to backpack hip-hop, or the Dusty Foot Philosophers who used to shuck mixtapes from their trunks, Steddy gives a hint as to how much effort and time he puts into his music, stating "my white tees still fit from middle school". I just hope they look as clean as his delivery. Next, Steddy and Bounce bring you a more thought provoking track in "No Matter How", in which Steddy gives you a slight insight into himself and his own mindstate. He gives you a kind of softer feel during the chorus when he states that he's "trying to make this music work... take it on the road/ I'm tryin' to make these wings work... fly around the globe...". The sample behind helps to draw out that feeling echoing "No Matter How", and as if in response, with every verse Steddy puts his mind to work and basically vocalizes in rhyme form the "Here's How". The title track "Style Like Mind" begins with a kind of caution to the average hip-hop listener, with Steddy stating that "Thanks to Mr. Ben Bounce I can be as weird as I wanna be.". The flow gets quicker while the beat is a little slower, making for a great mixture of the underground sound since lost to the dusty crates of DJ's and the annuls of the old school. And as if to bring you back to the days, Steddy uses his play on LL Cool J's line for which the album is titled to say that you won't hear this kind of hip-hop done anywhere else. I do have to admit that Ben Bounce did allow Steddy to go a little nuts on this track, but it works for Steddy's "Style Like Mind". In "Miss You", Steddy and Ben go deeper and more loving, with Steddy telling a significant other that he enjoys her and her support of his music, but hates the fighting that it causes. Consistantly begging her to "Calm down... Please Please Please" because no matter what the fight is about he still must travel "so I can eat emcees". It is apparent on this track that he's not about to eat just yet though, because as the track plays he tells a story about the relationship that they share and how much it bothers both of them to argue and fight all the time. Being a musician, I completely understand where Steddy and Bounce came from with this track, because doing shows is hard enough without having to deal with a partner who allows the petty things to continue to get to them. And as if to not continue the fight, he tells her not to "worry about that L word, just know I miss you." He changes his tune later on, but you'll have to listen to hear that. The "Indylude" gives you n insight into who you're listening to, and with whom they represent. Check out the track yourself and see if you have any of them in your music library. Steddy and Bounce get right back into it with "Without You", and as the horns dig in deep a la Bounce, you hear Steddy reaching another level of his "Style Like Mind". One of my favorite lines is one that I completely agree with - "there's a lot of good music, a lot of it is BORING". I can tell you that THIS is not what he was talking about. Their love of hip-hop shows blatantly through the track, and the Erykah Badu sample is lively above the droning horns while the synth adds a more conclusive melody to the track. It also helps that Steddy adds his own soul to the music, singing "I don't know what I'd do without you Hip-Hop". "Steddy Persistance" is just pure madness. Can I say that again? "Steddy Persistance" is just PURE MADNESS. If you don't like this track, you must not have ears. I won't even review it. I'll leave you to review it at your own leisure. What I will say is that Steddy P and Ben Bounce should have called that track "Evil Genius". A success story named "Maverick" ensues after, and through 2 minutes and 30 seconds, Steddy P goes through a fall and rise of a man who, if you pay attention to the track, could also live inside each and every one of us. The riding beat really gives Steddy something to go on, and while the first verse sounds a little sad over the beat, Steddy turns it around and makes it sound joyous. I guarantee that 2:31 was not time wasted... I only wish Maverick would have had a longer lifetime on the album. Release is another high point, and as I won't go to deep, I will say that Indyground and Peacetable really did a number on the number 11 for me. And that's in the greatest way. "Kenneth Arnold" brings more craziness to your deck, and it's almost like Steddy has become his own alter ego at times. This is the point you start to think maybe Steddy P is clinically schizophrenic, but with a "Style Like Mind" can you blame him? Here, Steddy uses a lot of quips and quibbles and really flexes his lyrical muscle to bring a more comical experience to the mic. "Look at the flying saucer!" As for the rest of the album, Steddy uses some style switches and guest appearances from his own label Indyground, and you can tell he and Ben Bounce took their time to ensure that this was not just another throw away album so many artists make and put out just to have product on store shelves. For any track I haven't reviewed, I hope that gives you all the more incentive to purchase your own copy of "Steddy P: Style Like Mind" for yourself. If you're a fan of hip-hop, this is definitely an album for the collection. Comment by Kevin from Colorado Springs on Oct 16th, 2009, 14:04 pm

Posted by ? on 10/16/2009 at 9:20 PM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

OK... first off... I don't apologize for what's being said because you SHOULD hear it from someone.

This has to be the most disorientating, unfocused, ignorant display of writing I've EVER seen. I mean, you're supposed to review a record and the only thing you focus on is basically "hating" on the vocalist. You didn't write ANYTHING about beats or overall concepts and how they fit with his style, and you DEFINITELY didn't give any compelling arguments for your criticisms. You basically just slandered a man's name all throughout one paragraph (albeit using big words you probably got from the thesaurus which actually GLORIFIED that same man), and gave basically no respect to someone who probably works harder than YOU on an everyday basis just to get his name out. You have to be the worst disgrace to journalism and reviews I've ever seen. I listened to the album. Steddy comes with some great delivery, and those tracks where you said extra syllables were added on were more for effect and evoking the emotion of the track than anything else. It wasn't done horribly. There are plenty of artists who can't even MAKE a decent track, let alone get someone to listen and review it. Whoever put this album on your desk for review should have fired you for this low brow attempt at slander and hate. Maybe you hold a grudge with Steddy, I don't know, but there were other people involved in this project whom you COMPLETELY NEGLECTED to mention. Ben Bounce, who has started getting a lot of recognition throughout the Midwest, East Coast and Front Range, MADE ALL OF THE BEATS FOR THIS LP. Apparently, you must have had all the a capella versions, because NOT ONCE did you mention HIM or his BEAT QUALITY and HOW IT FIT WITH THE TRACKS AS PRESENTED BY STEDDY P. You did NO RESEARCH on who they really are and what they bring, you gave NO EXPLANATIONS as to why you said what you said, and you showed NO REMORSE for basically slandering one man's name through your publication while basically ignoring another major player entirely. And then comparing them to MAINSTREAM famous people who have done their share and paid dues and are now well known throughout the country for more than just music now... Steddy P and Ben Bounce are not MAINSTREAM. It's called IndyGround for a reason, or did you not even take time to notice the printed cover with all the words so carefully laid out for you in plain English? If you're not willing to review someone for their art, and incorporate the whole sound (lyrics AND beats), then you obviously don't know what hip-hop is and should DEFINITELY not be reviewing it. Personally, I think you should go back to Desk work, because Artist Reviews are NOT YOUR THING. Stick to what YOU know, because I can tell you this... IT'S NOT HIP-HOP.

And now for a REAL review of Steddy P's LP "Style Like Mind" Produced by Ben Bounce for Peacetable Music.


From the intro to the LP, aptly named "Intro", you can tell you're listening to the gritty sounds of Ben Bounce (["i-Disciple:The Compass" - 2008] and ["1221:Inches" - 2009]). It also helps when he tells you through sample form that he is joining Steddy P on this venture. With his innovative cuts and scratches consistantly going through the track, you can tell he and Steddy are really "Ready with the one-two checkah".

Steddy makes his entrance on the second track "Won't Lay Down", in which Steddy and the sample both scream "STAND UP!", a popular theme throughout hip-hop music. Steddy however, does not balk at throwing his words around like a true professional, and even states in the tracks very first verse "if you wanna be successful, better come with the raw-est". And as a slight ode to backpack hip-hop, or the Dusty Foot Philosophers who used to shuck mixtapes from their trunks, Steddy gives a hint as to how much effort and time he puts into his music, stating "my white tees still fit from middle school". I just hope they look as clean as his delivery.

Next, Steddy and Bounce bring you a more thought provoking track in "No Matter How", in which Steddy gives you a slight insight into himself and his own mindstate. He gives you a kind of softer feel during the chorus when he states that he's "trying to make this music work... take it on the road/ I'm tryin' to make these wings work... fly around the globe...". The sample behind helps to draw out that feeling echoing "No Matter How", and as if in response, with every verse Steddy puts his mind to work and basically vocalizes in rhyme form the "Here's How".

The title track "Style Like Mind" begins with a kind of caution to the average hip-hop listener, with Steddy stating that "Thanks to Mr. Ben Bounce I can be as weird as I wanna be.". The flow gets quicker while the beat is a little slower, making for a great mixture of the underground sound since lost to the dusty crates of DJ's and the annuls of the old school. And as if to bring you back to the days, Steddy uses his play on LL Cool J's line for which the album is titled to say that you won't hear this kind of hip-hop done anywhere else. I do have to admit that Ben Bounce did allow Steddy to go a little nuts on this track, but it works for Steddy's "Style Like Mind".

In "Miss You", Steddy and Ben go deeper and more loving, with Steddy telling a significant other that he enjoys her and her support of his music, but hates the fighting that it causes. Consistantly begging her to "Calm down... Please Please Please" because no matter what the fight is about he still must travel "so I can eat emcees". It is apparent on this track that he's not about to eat just yet though, because as the track plays he tells a story about the relationship that they share and how much it bothers both of them to argue and fight all the time. Being a musician, I completely understand where Steddy and Bounce came from with this track, because doing shows is hard enough without having to deal with a partner who allows the petty things to continue to get to them. And as if to not continue the fight, he tells her not to "worry about that L word, just know I miss you." He changes his tune later on, but you'll have to listen to hear that.

The "Indylude" gives you n insight into who you're listening to, and with whom they represent. Check out the track yourself and see if you have any of them in your music library.

Steddy and Bounce get right back into it with "Without You", and as the horns dig in deep a la Bounce, you hear Steddy reaching another level of his "Style Like Mind". One of my favorite lines is one that I completely agree with - "there's a lot of good music, a lot of it is BORING". I can tell you that THIS is not what he was talking about. Their love of hip-hop shows blatantly through the track, and the Erykah Badu sample is lively above the droning horns while the synth adds a more conclusive melody to the track. It also helps that Steddy adds his own soul to the music, singing "I don't know what I'd do without you Hip-Hop".

"Steddy Persistance" is just pure madness. Can I say that again? "Steddy Persistance" is just PURE MADNESS. If you don't like this track, you must not have ears. I won't even review it. I'll leave you to review it at your own leisure. What I will say is that Steddy P and Ben Bounce should have called that track "Evil Genius".

A success story named "Maverick" ensues after, and through 2 minutes and 30 seconds, Steddy P goes through a fall and rise of a man who, if you pay attention to the track, could also live inside each and every one of us. The riding beat really gives Steddy something to go on, and while the first verse sounds a little sad over the beat, Steddy turns it around and makes it sound joyous. I guarantee that 2:31 was not time wasted... I only wish Maverick would have had a longer lifetime on the album.

Release is another high point, and as I won't go to deep, I will say that Indyground and Peacetable really did a number on the number 11 for me. And that's in the greatest way.

"Kenneth Arnold" brings more craziness to your deck, and it's almost like Steddy has become his own alter ego at times. This is the point you start to think maybe Steddy P is clinically schizophrenic, but with a "Style Like Mind" can you blame him? Here, Steddy uses a lot of quips and quibbles and really flexes his lyrical muscle to bring a more comical experience to the mic. "Look at the flying saucer!"

As for the rest of the album, Steddy uses some style switches and guest appearances from his own label Indyground, and you can tell he and Ben Bounce took their time to ensure that this was not just another throw away album so many artists make and put out just to have product on store shelves. For any track I haven't reviewed, I hope that gives you all the more incentive to purchase your own copy of "Steddy P: Style Like Mind" for yourself. If you're a fan of hip-hop, this is definitely an album for the collection.

Posted by Kevin on 10/16/2009 at 5:04 PM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

OK... first off... I don't apologize for what's being said because you SHOULD hear it from someone. This has to be the most disorientating, unfocused, ignorant display of writing I've EVER seen. I mean, you're supposed to review a record and the only thing you focus on is basically "hating" on the vocalist. You didn't write ANYTHING about beats or overall concepts and how they fit with his style, and you DEFINITELY didn't give any compelling arguments for your criticisms. You basically just slandered a man's name all throughout one paragraph (albeit using big words you probably got from the thesaurus which actually GLORIFIED that same man), and gave basically no respect to someone who probably works harder than YOU on an everyday basis just to get his name out. You have to be the worst disgrace to journalism and reviews I've ever seen. I listened to the album. Steddy comes with some great delivery, and those tracks where you said extra syllables were added on were more for effect and evoking the emotion of the track than anything else. It wasn't done horribly. There are plenty of artists who can't even MAKE a decent track, let alone get someone to listen and review it. Whoever put this album on your desk for review should have fired you for this low brow attempt at slander and hate. Maybe you hold a grudge with Steddy, I don't know, but there were other people involved in this project whom you COMPLETELY NEGLECTED to mention. Ben Bounce, who has started getting a lot of recognition throughout the Midwest, East Coast and Front Range, MADE ALL OF THE BEATS FOR THIS LP. Apparently, you must have had all the a capella versions, because NOT ONCE did you mention HIM or his BEAT QUALITY and HOW IT FIT WITH THE TRACKS AS PRESENTED BY STEDDY P. You did NO RESEARCH on who they really are and what they bring, you gave NO EXPLANATIONS as to why you said what you said, and you showed NO REMORSE for basically slandering one man's name through your publication while basically ignoring another major player entirely. And then comparing them to MAINSTREAM famous people who have done their share and paid dues and are now well known throughout the country for more than just music now... Steddy P and Ben Bounce are not MAINSTREAM. It's called IndyGround for a reason, or did you not even take time to notice the printed cover with all the words so carefully laid out for you in plain English? If you're not willing to review someone for their art, and incorporate the whole sound (lyrics AND beats), then you obviously don't know what hip-hop is and should DEFINITELY not be reviewing it. Personally, I think you should go back to Desk work, because Artist Reviews are NOT YOUR THING. Stick to what YOU know, because I can tell you this... IT'S NOT HIP-HOP. And now for a REAL review of Steddy P's LP "Style Like Mind" Produced by Ben Bounce for Peacetable Music. From the intro to the LP, aptly named "Intro", you can tell you're listening to the gritty sounds of Ben Bounce (["i-Disciple:The Compass" - 2008] and ["1221:Inches" - 2009]). It also helps when he tells you through sample form that he is joining Steddy P on this venture. With his innovative cuts and scratches consistantly going through the track, you can tell he and Steddy are really "Ready with the one-two checkah". Steddy makes his entrance on the second track "Won't Lay Down", in which Steddy and the sample both scream "STAND UP!", a popular theme throughout hip-hop music. Steddy however, does not balk at throwing his words around like a true professional, and even states in the tracks very first verse "if you wanna be successful, better come with the raw-est". And as a slight ode to backpack hip-hop, or the Dusty Foot Philosophers who used to shuck mixtapes from their trunks, Steddy gives a hint as to how much effort and time he puts into his music, stating "my white tees still fit from middle school". I just hope they look as clean as his delivery. Next, Steddy and Bounce bring you a more thought provoking track in "No Matter How", in which Steddy gives you a slight insight into himself and his own mindstate. He gives you a kind of softer feel during the chorus when he states that he's "trying to make this music work... take it on the road/ I'm tryin' to make these wings work... fly around the globe...". The sample behind helps to draw out that feeling echoing "No Matter How", and as if in response, with every verse Steddy puts his mind to work and basically vocalizes in rhyme form the "Here's How". The title track "Style Like Mind" begins with a kind of caution to the average hip-hop listener, with Steddy stating that "Thanks to Mr. Ben Bounce I can be as weird as I wanna be.". The flow gets quicker while the beat is a little slower, making for a great mixture of the underground sound since lost to the dusty crates of DJ's and the annuls of the old school. And as if to bring you back to the days, Steddy uses his play on LL Cool J's line for which the album is titled to say that you won't hear this kind of hip-hop done anywhere else. I do have to admit that Ben Bounce did allow Steddy to go a little nuts on this track, but it works for Steddy's "Style Like Mind". In "Miss You", Steddy and Ben go deeper and more loving, with Steddy telling a significant other that he enjoys her and her support of his music, but hates the fighting that it causes. Consistantly begging her to "Calm down... Please Please Please" because no matter what the fight is about he still must travel "so I can eat emcees". It is apparent on this track that he's not about to eat just yet though, because as the track plays he tells a story about the relationship that they share and how much it bothers both of them to argue and fight all the time. Being a musician, I completely understand where Steddy and Bounce came from with this track, because doing shows is hard enough without having to deal with a partner who allows the petty things to continue to get to them. And as if to not continue the fight, he tells her not to "worry about that L word, just know I miss you." He changes his tune later on, but you'll have to listen to hear that. The "Indylude" gives you n insight into who you're listening to, and with whom they represent. Check out the track yourself and see if you have any of them in your music library. Steddy and Bounce get right back into it with "Without You", and as the horns dig in deep a la Bounce, you hear Steddy reaching another level of his "Style Like Mind". One of my favorite lines is one that I completely agree with - "there's a lot of good music, a lot of it is BORING". I can tell you that THIS is not what he was talking about. Their love of hip-hop shows blatantly through the track, and the Erykah Badu sample is lively above the droning horns while the synth adds a more conclusive melody to the track. It also helps that Steddy adds his own soul to the music, singing "I don't know what I'd do without you Hip-Hop". "Steddy Persistance" is just pure madness. Can I say that again? "Steddy Persistance" is just PURE MADNESS. If you don't like this track, you must not have ears. I won't even review it. I'll leave you to review it at your own leisure. What I will say is that Steddy P and Ben Bounce should have called that track "Evil Genius". A success story named "Maverick" ensues after, and through 2 minutes and 30 seconds, Steddy P goes through a fall and rise of a man who, if you pay attention to the track, could also live inside each and every one of us. The riding beat really gives Steddy something to go on, and while the first verse sounds a little sad over the beat, Steddy turns it around and makes it sound joyous. I guarantee that 2:31 was not time wasted... I only wish Maverick would have had a longer lifetime on the album. Release is another high point, and as I won't go to deep, I will say that Indyground and Peacetable really did a number on the number 11 for me. And that's in the greatest way. "Kenneth Arnold" brings more craziness to your deck, and it's almost like Steddy has become his own alter ego at times. This is the point you start to think maybe Steddy P is clinically schizophrenic, but with a "Style Like Mind" can you blame him? Here, Steddy uses a lot of quips and quibbles and really flexes his lyrical muscle to bring a more comical experience to the mic. "Look at the flying saucer!" As for the rest of the album, Steddy uses some style switches and guest appearances from his own label Indyground, and you can tell he and Ben Bounce took their time to ensure that this was not just another throw away album so many artists make and put out just to have product on store shelves. For any track I haven't reviewed, I hope that gives you all the more incentive to purchase your own copy of "Steddy P: Style Like Mind" for yourself. If you're a fan of hip-hop, this is definitely an album for the collection.

Posted by Kevin on 10/16/2009 at 2:04 PM

Re: “The Beatbox: Steddy P.

Man, really? Sounds like a pissed off, former musician wrote this. Say what you want about the other 4 or 5 records, but this one is not consistent with them at all. It smashes them. Critics will be what they are though. Tech and Mac will both tell you that nobody in that city is working harder. Ask them.

Posted by dheim31 on 10/14/2009 at 8:49 PM

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