A team's long day's journey into One Night Stand 

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"The people who do a bad film, they're generally kind of embarrassed or browbeaten into forcing themselves to work harder," he says. "When I put on a crap film, and the guy behind me puts on an awesome one, I get pissed off because I just spent 10 hours of my day working on this film. And I look at this baby that I've created, and I go, 'Oh, my baby is ugly.' "

Harvey hasn't entered many ugly babies in One Night Stand. The IFC vice president took home the top prize in 2009 with Bedtime, an almost dialogue-free film that explored the seedy nightlife enjoyed by toddlers after their parents put them to bed. Tykes unafraid of a little Russian roulette the night before Gymboree proved irresistibly charming to judges and audience members.

This year Harvey's entry is a departure: a romance centered on the syrupy song "One Day Like This" by U.K. band Elbow. "It's going to be ridiculously romantic, ridiculously sweet," he says a few days before the contest. "I haven't done anything like this, which is one of the reasons to do it. I've done a little bit of every genre, but I've never done a blatant, old-fashioned, sweet, romantic story. It's either going to work really, really well or fail beautifully."


Any director working on a tight budget is accustomed to begging for favors and free labor from friends. On a 10-hour deadline, the need for no-questions-asked help goes into overdrive.

To secure Revolution Church for the wedding scene, Harvey tapped Dustin Adair, a screenwriter who's also helping with wardrobe. Adair is a member of the congregation, and he got permission to borrow the space. Adding to the favor is the thrift shop in Revolution's basement, which doubles today as the cast's costume department. Adair and Sutcliffe poke around for a while before settling on the soon-to-be-problematic gray dress while crew members set up lighting for the first shot, in which actors Chris Bylsma and Krystal Heib get married. Paul Campbell, the director of photography, scouts the sanctuary for the right angle, then takes his Canon EOS Rebel T2i behind a cross.

Bylsma, a handsome man whose face is dominated by a reddish beard and curly hair, places a ring on Heib's finger. They kiss, and a few extras (strategically deployed to make the church appear full) stand and applaud. Harvey has sketched the film almost entirely as a montage set to the song. This is in part to prevent time-consuming flubbed lines. Playing it safe, though, the director orders five takes of this first shot.

"Who are we kidding, Paul?" Bylsma says, holding his beautiful brunette pretend wife. "I gave you five bucks to let me do this a few more times."

Satisfied with the couple's kiss, Harvey calls for the second scene, in which newlyweds Bylsma and Heib walk out the church's front door. Outside Revolution, Campbell begins setting up his shot — then spies the more photogenic Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church, nearby. Campbell and Harvey walk over to the church to see if they can get into the building, but the doors are locked. They're stuck with their original site.

Jason Miller, who plays a groomsman in the film, is in charge of the project's next favor: a camera rig that fits on a radio-controlled helicopter, a slick black gizmo powered by four propellers. It looks like something jacked from a CIA warehouse. Miller starts the shot by flying the camera high up on the front of the church, then gently gliding it down and away to capture the couple bounding out of the church. After a few takes, the Hellions have the shot they want, and it's a wrap at the church. It's 11:11 a.m., a few minutes behind Harvey's shooting schedule.

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