A new restaurant with an uncommon calling.

Anna's Oven keeps the blue-plate dream warm on 39th Street 

A new restaurant with an uncommon calling.

A ghost haunts 1809 West 39th Street. Not a menacing poltergeist but rather the generous spirit of a Great Depression-era farm wife. Anna prepared home-style dishes for her family and anyone else who dropped by the old property.

That's the story I've managed to piece together in four visits to the new Anna's Oven restaurant on 39th Street. There's a photograph of Anna in the restaurant, and a shadow box displays one of her spoons. It's either a tarnished old piece or a holy relic, depending on which employee you're talking with about it. You see, no one working at Anna's Oven — except, perhaps Anna's great-grandson Luke, who works in the kitchen and doesn't seem to say much — really knows the story of Anna.

I suppose I could call Ruth Dakota, the granddaughter of the restaurant's namesake and one of the investors in Anna's Oven, to get the exact story of the woman who inspired this four-month-old dining spot. But, no, I kind of like the Rashomon quality of each response to the question "Who was Anna?" She lived in Minnesota, one employee told me. No, it was Kansas, another said. The menu reports that Anna prepared her meals during the Great Depression, but a server told me one night that her cooking peaked in the early 1900s.

The heartwarming tale of generous, grandmotherly Anna is trotted out primarily in service to this restaurant's distinct mission. This isn't just a place to eat but also a forum for raising charitable contributions. Once Anna's Oven is more financially stable, the plan is to donate 50 percent of its profits to educational charities. (Its first project: a girls' school in Kenya.)

But there haven't been profits so far. "The restaurant isn't covering its costs yet," says Ling Chang, owner of Genghis Khan Mongolian Grill and the Blue Koi and also one of the co-owners of Anna's Oven.

I wonder if it ever will. Anna's Oven, where customers order at a counter and are served their meals at the table, has a limited — very limited — menu of dishes, and the prices are ridiculously low. The most expensive entrée on the menu costs $10. On a recent night, my friend Bob had the three-course special — salad, pasta and a dessert — for $8. This at a time when upscale dining rooms charge $8 and more for just the dessert.

Here's the part where I must be a little uncharitable, though. Bob got what he paid for when he ordered that cheap meal. It reminded me of something I could have thrown together for friends on a Sunday afternoon: a nice little green salad, a modest portion of macaroni and cheese with roast chicken, and a fruit cobbler. (Wait — I have served that meal, at least to myself.)

The Anna's folks aren't kidding when they stress that this is a home-style dining experience. There are fewer than a dozen tables in the place, and several are made to be shared by people who didn't arrive together. When the restaurant opened, it used disposable plates and cutlery, until the customers complained. "We're in transition now," explained the engagingly friendly manager, Jamie, who handed me a plastic knife so that I could butter my slice of yeasty focaccia from the Bagel Works bakery.

Most of the serving pieces now are real china, and metal spoons and forks are offered, but the chilled roasted-tomato soup I ate the other night (it was very good) was served in a Styrofoam bowl. Yeah, I know that doesn't bother a lot of people, but Anna wouldn't have liked it.

Comments (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

More by Charles Ferruzza

Latest in Restaurant Reviews

Facebook Activity

All contents ©2014 Kansas City Pitch LLC
All rights reserved. No part of this service may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of Kansas City Pitch LLC,
except that an individual may download and/or forward articles via email to a reasonable number of recipients for personal, non-commercial purposes.

All contents © 2012 SouthComm, Inc. 210 12th Ave S. Ste. 100, Nashville, TN 37203. (615) 244-7989.
All rights reserved. No part of this service may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of SouthComm, Inc.
except that an individual may download and/or forward articles via email to a reasonable number of recipients for personal, non-commercial purposes.
Website powered by Foundation