Anthony Baab continues to push boundaries at Grand Arts.

Capturing Anthony Baab's complex structures at Grand Arts 

Anthony Baab continues to push boundaries at Grand Arts.

click to enlarge "Patristic isizons"

Anthony Baab

"Patristic isizons"

The day after artist Anthony Baab's A Strenuous Nonbeing opened, more than 50 people showed up at Grand Arts to hear him talk about his latest exhibition. Stacy Switzer, the space's artistic director, said it was the largest crowd she'd seen there for such an event.

The weather helped. January 19 was an unseasonably warm day, almost as hospitable as the previous night, when the show opened. And Baab has earned a following with his arresting, intricate images. But there was also the matter of the cats — about which, more in a minute.

Baab has described his earlier work as "very controlled," and the deep sense of detail in much of A Strenuous Nonbeing is in line with that self-assessment. These latest works are the result of nearly three years spent building, rebuilding, documenting and altering, and they add up to a soaring statement about in-between states, touching on ideas of scale, time, history and language.

Those who are familiar with Baab's previous work will recognize his signature tape-drawing method on the first piece hanging inside the gallery door, titled "clod paerati." The subject of the photograph is a symmetrical structure, centered in front of a garage door inside what, for a time, was Baab's studio. Credit for the photo goes to KC's go-to shooter for artists, E.G. Schempf. Baab's tape drawings have often been made on others' photos (with many on found images), so "clod" both retraces a habit and hints at Baab's creative progress.

The structure in "clod" — a cardboard thing, a model of a building never meant to be built — has no practical use, Baab told his January 19 audience. But a version of the 13-foot-high assemblage functioned very well as a place for cats to perch, play and scuffle. In the video that shares a title with this exhibition, those cats' antics were live-streamed during the opening, and the three-hour loop is being projected in nearly life scale for the remainder of the show.

On the photo, innumerable strips of narrow white tape give Baab's towering geometrical "building" an armature, a faux scaffolding that recalls the iron latticework of the Eiffel Tower and seems to hold it up. In the video, which plays in Grand Arts' dark, small side gallery, the cats act as our proxy, experiencing firsthand a model we're unable to access.

And on the evidence, it's a good time. It's hard to know how many cats are taking part, and keeping track of them is a challenge as they jump around, entering and exiting the frame, and picking at invisible treats. Much of the time, they just lurk, as all cats do, indifferent to our presence.

Baab said he used the cats because they are beautiful and unpredictable. (More unpredictable still, perhaps, given that these cats aren't Baab's. Our metro, it turns out, has its own professional cat wrangler, who spent a couple of days talking with the artist about how to procure just the right animals.) They don't act how you expect them to, he added, but they always do a good job. Here, they add a bit of levity to what is a fairly concept-heavy and visually stark exhibition.

All nine of the framed photographs at Grand Arts are impressively large (as tall or wide as 75 inches). Two of them are not single prints under glass but rather layers and layers of prints of other structures, surviving as only the two-dimensional outlines of themselves. The skeletal and topographical results reveal Baab's meticulous process of cutting away (décollage), as though he's X-raying his own creation. Each is marvelous, a telescopic collapse of time.

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