Our critics recommend these shows.

Art Capsule Reviews 

Our critics recommend these shows.

Blood Work When she was 7 months old, the daughter of Taiwanese artist Jawshing Arthur Liou was diagnosed with leukemia. Liou went on to document her struggle with the disease through the impressionistic images in these three video and sound installations. In "CBC" (an acronym for "complete blood count"), dreamy, soft-focus snowflakes fall while tiny people appear to run between the flakes and then disappear; these scenes are interspersed with the image of a red shape that expands as if it's breathing. In "Hairline," we hear a low, ugly hum as babies with oversized heads rise and fall down, flying upward and out of frame in quick succession against a blood-colored background. "Elements" shows hyperactive babies crawling and rolling, darting over bloody terrain and moving to form a soft white shimmer of shapes — possibly white blood cells — to be covered in a seeping ooze of red. All of the pieces are meditative and mysterious, personal without being sentimental or exploitative. Through April 22 at the Society for Contemporary Photography, 520 Avenida Cesar E. Chavez, 816-471-2115. (R.T.B.)

(Un)Redeemable Moments: Bobby Belote, Curt Bozif and Brian Zimmerman Of all the intriguing work on display at the Bank, Curt Bozif's obsessive pieces stay with the viewer like images branded on the brain. His preferred shape is the circle; in "To Mother's Escape," the center of a chalkboard is worn down in a circular shape to create a pile of dust on the chalk tray beneath it — a handmade sun over a handmade desert. "One Day" chronicles a 24-hour walk in one place on a rug. Thousands of ballpoint pen lines stacked on one another make "Lines for Micah" and "Every Lamb to Its Shepherds" appear as tapestries. Elsewhere are playful and sublime pieces by Brian Zimmerman, such as the hand-stamped roll of tickets in "Please Take One," allowing holders to "renounce," be "free" or "play." In "Oil and Water," a row of five rings attached to fishing lines are dropped into glasses of liquid again and again — the romantic devolving into the mundane. Through May 6 at the Bank, 11th St. and Baltimore, 816-221-5115. (R.T.B.)

Zealothrone Mindfield: Anthony Baab and Colin Leipelt In the wonderfully titled "Sky Is a Fossil for the Mountain Within It," Anthony Baab uses only pencil and colored tape to create an intriguing depiction of a mountain, doubled, with two concentric circles and neat draft lines vertically and horizontally breaking the plane. This and Baab's other work, "Baths," appear like blueprints from the mind of a mad architect. Unfortunately, one speaker was blown in Colin Leipelt's sound installation, "Abysmal Depths Are Flooded." The digital print "Torn into Enthrallment" at least appears to create sound waves broadcast from the tops of two geometric towers. Leipelt's pencil-on-blackboard paint skulls are dark, mysterious meditations on death (or something like it), and they make it clear that even skeletons age. Through May 6 at Paragraph, 23 East 12th Street, 816-221-5115. (R.T.B.)

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