Game Changes 

Perhaps there's no narrative in American sports as compelling as the self-imposed, decades-long segregation of baseball. It ended up being, at least in the eyes of Ken Burns, a metaphorically rich example of America's triumph over racism. And while the major leagues now send scouts to Cuba and Japan, one wonders how racism — or at least the perception of race — has changed in professional sports. Are the social myths and stereotypes today significantly different from those of 70 years ago? This is the subject of Thabiti Lewis' book, Ballers of the New School: Race and Sports in America, which he reads from at the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum (1616 East 18th Street, 816-221-1920) as part of the museum's "Baseball Book Notes" author series. The 10 a.m. reading is free with paid admission to the museum ($8 for adults), but seating is limited. — Danny Volin


Sat., Feb. 26, 10 a.m., 2011

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