U.S. Rep. Sam Graves and his lackeys never miss an opportunity to rough up a local political race.

Goon Squad 

U.S. Rep. Sam Graves and his lackeys never miss an opportunity to rough up a local political race.

Page 7 of 7

Whorton says he called police, but no report of the incident was made. "They never did anything I could prove was illegal," Whorton says. "They're just ... assholes."

Patek has since gone to work for Missouri Secretary of State Matt Blunt, who wants to be governor. The Columbia Daily Tribune reported last year that Patek was drawing a salary from the state and from Blunt's campaign at the same time, an unusual arrangement that's legal under state law. A Blunt spokesman told the newspaper that Patek worked on campaign matters only in his spare time.

The Pitch reached Patek on his cell phone and asked if he recalled the incident that Fairchild had described.

"I really don't recall," Patek said.

"You don't recall going to his house?" the Pitch asked.

"I really don't."

"Is it possible you did?"

"It certainly is. I know Mr. Fairchild to be honest in the past. I have no reason to believe he's not now. I don't recall now but ... "

"So you don't recall going to his house?"

"No. When was this?"

Patek was told it would have been two years ago. He laughed for a moment. "I do a lot of campaign activities that I don't recall," he said.

The conversation ended with Patek saying he would try to jog his memory and call the Pitch back. He never did.

Like countless others warriors of business and politics, Roe names Sun Tzu's The Art of War as a favorite book.

Roe supplied that cliched detail to the Kansas City business magazine Ingram's, which last year included him in its list of "40 leaders under 40."

What else is known about Roe? He is in his early thirties and from Brookfield. In 2000 he told the University of Missouri-Columbia's Missouri Digital News Web site that he grew up in a family of Goldwater Republicans. He started volunteering for political campaigns while in high school, and his first paid work was for Graves in 1994. In his spare time, he said, he umpired baseball games.

At the time he gave the interview, Roe was working for both Graves brothers: Sam Graves was running for U.S. Congress, and Todd Graves was running for state treasurer. (Todd lost.) Roe described himself as a relentless money raiser. "I once called a contributor 27 times in St. Louis to take a meeting with Todd," he said.

Sam Graves' office announced on April 28 that Roe was no longer the congressman's chief of staff. Roe, it appears, wanted to break the legal shackles that prevent federal employees from engaging in political activity while working in a government office. The press release said that Roe was returning to Missouri to consult on political campaigns, including Graves'.

"I hate not to have him in the Washington office," Graves said in the press release. "However, I'm glad that he'll be able to devote his full attention to the election process."

Missouri office seekers, beware.

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