Clint K's "three-man group" prepares to take its powerful live show to the Web.

Oh, K 

Clint K's "three-man group" prepares to take its powerful live show to the Web.

Plenty of rockers, while they employ a band, enjoy sole billing -- artists such as Bruce Springsteen and Melissa Etheridge. Likewise, there are plenty of rockabilly groups that use that "Bill Haley and the Comets" construction and blues acts that acknowledge the presence of the other musicians while still naming only the star (The Rockin' Johnny Band). Straightforward rock acts that choose either of the aforementioned formats are rare, but the Lawrence-based Clint K Band toyed with one before settling on the other. Explains guitarist/vocalist Clint Kueffer, the band's titular member, "We were always going to be 'Clint K and the fill-in-the-blank,' but the 'blank' never got filled in."

Filling out the band has turned out to be a much easier task, as Kueffer started his career with a solo effort in 1997. Then playing under the name Clint K, Kueffer enlisted drummer David Pressgrove and brother/bass player Chet Kueffer, and the newly formed trio, using Clint's CD as an ice-breaker with club bookers, started taking its off-kilter, hook-laden, arena-ready rock to the clubs. When Pressgrove left to attend Hillsdale College in Michigan on a running scholarship two years ago, Jason Green, whose band No One's Judge had just called it quits, took his place behind the kit.

Although placing two brothers in a band occasionally can incite nasty sibling rivalries, the Kueffers continue to play together harmoniously. "We both love each other so much that when one of us gets on the other's nerves, we feel free to communicate it without there being any deep feelings about it," Clint explains. "We can gripe at each other and go to bed happy, and it's not a big deal. A lot of times, I'll show him a song I've started, and without even giving him an idea for what I think the bass line should be like, he's already hearing what I'm hearing. We're kind of on the same wavelength musically."

The brothers Kueffer used this uncanny connection to concoct songs such as "Three Man Band." "Chet had been working on a song over at his place one night, and I'd been working on another song at my place," Clint remembers. "The very next day we get together and he's like, 'Hey, I want to show you something.' He starts playing this bassline, and I said, 'You've got to be kidding me. I want to show you something,' and both parts of our two songs fit together perfectly." More coincidence ensued. "They're even in the same key, which is unbelievable." As further proof of their synchronicity, each brother told the same story in separate interviews.

More than just the subject of a good story, "Three Man Band" is now slated to be the title of the group's next record. The band has already booked studio time in January, and the boys are keeping in mind some lessons they learned from the recording of their previous disc, Here We Go. "Giving the time that we had and the resources we had available, doing 16 songs was probably biting off more than we could chew," Clint admits. "This time, even though we've got maybe 16 better songs to choose from, we're going to try to cut back to the neighborhood of 12, 13 songs and try to do them better if we can. We're not ashamed of Here We Go, but I just think we can do a better one this time."

"Three Man Band" is also a first-person tribute to the group's live shows, on which it prides itself greatly. "It's kind of hokey in a sense, but it's just about us being a three-man band, going to the show, and rocking it," Clint says. "We want people to feel like they had a good reason for coming as opposed to just listening to the tape or CD at home, that's the main thing. Giving our all and giving an all-out performance, having nothing left afterwards almost like we were playing a game."

Regardless of how much love The Clint K Band exudes, soon the Internet-addicted won't have to show up. Its show on Saturday, November 4 at The Bottleneck will be broadcast on Digital Club Network (www.digitalclubnetwork.com), a Web site that streams performances from clubs all over the globe.

Although fairly Web-informed (the group's online home is www.clintkband.com), Chet admits the Digital Club Network initially befuddled him. "Just the other day I got on there and registered some stuff, but I couldn't figure out how to register our band because it was kind of complicated. I was like, 'Well, I've done what I can,'" he says with a twinge of recalled defeat. Nonetheless, he soldiered on, and now he's hoping that the completed product will serve as an invaluable calling card, assisting his band in getting gigs at less-virtual venues. "It's great for booking purposes and whatnot to say, 'Hey, you can check us out on there and watch our show,'" Chet says. "There's such a big difference between a record and being on stage. It's totally different, and it can be especially advantageous for us because we put on a pretty high-energy, crazy show, and sometimes it's hard to get all that on a record. Some people spend their whole lives trying to get their live show on a record and never do it, so just to give people an opportunity to see you is a pretty cool deal."

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