Susan Stuckey told Prairie Village police to shoot her. Records show she didn't have to wait very long. 

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"Everybody tried to get her on their team," Stewart tells The Pitch.

Stewart recalls happier times in her daughter's life.

"In fact, she used to tell me when she was younger, 'I'm so happy, Mother,' " Stewart says.

Sometime in Stuckey's early teens, though, Stewart noticed a stark change in her daughter. She could think of no explanation for it, and her daughter offered none.

"She loved good music and she would be listening to her music, and I could hear her and see her ... she would be in the family room and she just looked so sad," Stewart recalls. "So I would say, 'Susan, what's wrong, honey?' And she would always say, 'Nothing, nothing.' "

Stewart contacted her doctor, who in turn referred the family to a psychologist.

Despite her withdrawal, Stuckey did well at Shawnee Mission West High School, from which she graduated in 1980. From there, she went to the University of Kansas and studied psychology and broadcasting. After graduating from KU, she set out on a successful sales career.

It wasn't until a visit to her mom's house when Stuckey was 30 that Stewart began to understand what had distressed her daughter for so long. Stuckey revealed that the father of two girls, for whom she had baby-sat in her early teens, had sexually assaulted her.

Then the psychologist Stuckey had been sent to raped her as well.

Stewart tells The Pitch: "When she left, I called the psychologist's office, and the receptionist answered the phone, and I said I want to talk to Mr. So-and-So [Stewart declines to identify the psychologist], and she said, 'He's with a patient now,' and I said, 'I don't care who he's with, I'm on the phone. I'm Susan Stuckey's mother. I demand that I talk to him right now.'

"So I guess he went to someplace private, and I told him my daughter had been there and in my house and what she had told me — that he raped her. He admitted it. He admitted it to me.' "

Stuckey's depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, Stewart says, stemmed from these events and eventually led to her going on disability in the two to three years before her death.

The last month of Stuckey's life appears to have been among her most troubling periods. Her behavior was by then marked by heavy drinking, run-ins with neighbors, and a fire in her unit that caused smoke and soot damage. An April 1 eviction hearing had been set for her in Johnson County District Court.

"She was going downhill fast, very fast," Stewart says. "She even told me at one time, and I quote this, 'I'm broken, Mother. I need help.' "


In the weeks preceding Stuckey's death, the Prairie Village police made several visits to her apartment, on the 4100 block of West 93rd Terrace.

On March 18, 2010, Prairie Village police officer Benjamin Micheel was dispatched to Kenilworth Apartments when a resident there reported suspicious activity. The man who summoned police told Micheel that, as he was leaving his apartment the previous evening, Stuckey asked him where he was going. She spoke to him from her second-floor balcony. The man, who hadn't met Stuckey before, told her that he was on his way to a local restaurant.

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