Susan Stuckey told Prairie Village police to shoot her. Records show she didn't have to wait very long. 

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"When you get back here, I'll be here," Stuckey told him, according to a police incident report.

The man later learned from a neighbor that Stuckey had looked into his windows. "I know he's in there," she said, according to the neighbor.

Micheel tried to confirm this with Stuckey; she told him to call her lawyer. She provided neither a name nor a phone number.

The next day, another Prairie Village officer returned to Stuckey's apartment. This time, she had called police herself to tell them that Kenilworth's management had stolen her pressure cooker. A manager told police that the pressure cooker had been taken because it was the source of the fire in Stuckey's apartment.

A Kenilworth resident went to the PVPD on March 24, a week before Stuckey's death, to report that Stuckey had chastised her for parking in a no-parking zone while unloading items from her car the day she moved in. The woman said Stuckey had threatened to call the police while yelling at her and taking cell-phone photos of her as she drove away.

On March 29, two Johnson County Mental Health staffers checked on Stuckey, who didn't open her door until they started to leave. At that point, they reported, Stuckey followed them, yelling and threatening to report them to police. Prairie Village police arrived to speak with Stuckey, but she insisted that she would call 911 if they remained near her apartment. One of the officers warned her that if she kept calling 911 (she had made several 911 calls the week before)‚ they would arrest her for making a false report.

The last time Prairie Village officers left Stuckey's apartment with her still alive was March 30, 2010, the night before her death.

A downstairs neighbor had called police, concerned after overhearing Stuckey yelling in her apartment and tossing a bag of trash out her back door. When officers Steve Steck and Craig Caster knocked on Stuckey's door, she insisted that they were untrustworthy and said she didn't care to speak to them, according to police records.

Stuckey warned Steck and Caster that she had a bat and would knock their heads off. She said the only way she was leaving her apartment was "suicide by cop," according to the incident report that the two officers filed.

Steck and Caster left, only to return after another Kenilworth resident reported that Stuckey had threatened to hit her with a softball. The officers noted in their report that Stuckey was agitated, yelling that Kenilworth was miserable. At one point, she tossed an ironing board out the window.

Stuckey told Steck and Caster that she would calm down if they brought her cigarettes. Joy Urich, an assistant manager at Kenilworth Apartments who had some rapport with Stuckey, went to fetch a pack of cigarettes. There was no answer at Stuckey's door when she returned, and Urich left them for her. After about 20 minutes of silence, Steck and Caster left.

Their colleagues would be back a few hours later.


Sgt. Byron Roberson slept about five hours before he woke up March 31, 2010, to get his twin sons ready for their day.

His routine was interrupted by a phone call from dispatchers telling him that Prairie Village Police Capt. Wes Lovett wanted to talk to him about the latest trouble with Susan Stuckey. Roberson knew about Stuckey because she was frequently on the police blotter.

Around 7 a.m., Stuckey had called police in Overland Park and Leawood and said officers were going to have to kill her.

Prairie Village officers Micheel and Brian Dennis were the first to arrive at Stuckey's apartment. She told them to "fuck off" when they announced who they were, according to Micheel's interview with the OISIT.

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