Susan Stuckey told Prairie Village police to shoot her. Records show she didn't have to wait very long. 

Page 6 of 8

After Stuckey's death, police did obtain a warrant to go through her apartment and collect evidence.

The CIRT arrived around 9:30 a.m., more than two hours after officers initially arrived at the scene. A few minutes later, officers deemed that negotiations were fruitless and decided to enter Stuckey's apartment, after giving her a final two-minute ultimatum to get out on her own.

Faggiano, the New York police veteran providing an expert opinion for the plaintiffs, writes in his report that ultimatums in barricaded-suspect situations are bad ideas, short of what's known as a "triggering event" — something that requires an immediate response.

Ijames, the expert for the police department, acknowledges in his report that deadlines are discouraged but maintains that the officers' handling of the plan was reasonable.

Lovett has denied issuing an ultimatum. But other officers, including Roberson, were under the impression that a two-minute deadline was part of the plan.

Roberson's team approached Stuckey's second-story apartment. Officer John Olson had the shield, Officer Dan Stewart was behind him, and Roberson was behind Stewart. Trailing them was Officer Seth Meyer, who carried a breacher to knock down the door.

Roberson told Taylor to let Stuckey know that she had two minutes to come out of her apartment. He said her response was more banging on the door and more threats to kill officers.

Roberson started counting down the first minute on his watch, then notified dispatch that they were going in.

In front of the door, the shield went up, and Officer Stewart put a key in Stuckey's lock.

Stuckey had chained the door, but officers could see her swinging a bat.

Roberson said in his interview that she had a look like "nobody's home." He went on: "And it wasn't like somebody you maybe be able to calm down and talk nicely to and get her to calm down. She didn't, she didn't appear to be reasonable."

Lovett said in his OISIT interview that Stuckey's voice had changed markedly from the time he was at her apartment the night before. The morning of March 31, he said, she sounded almost like a man.

Another member of Roberson's team worked to take the door off its hinges until it dislodged at an angle.

Roberson could now see Stuckey from the waist up. He stood in the doorway while the officers around him told Stuckey to put down her baseball bat. He held a Taser gun in his right hand, sizing up whether to use it to temporarily debilitate her.

The presence of that Taser contradicts the police officers' reported belief that Stuckey had created a fire hazard in her apartment. A Taser gives off an electrical charge and its use is discouraged near flammable liquid.

Roberson managed to take Stuckey's bat from her while firing a Taser round at her. He saw the Taser prongs hit her; the weapon had no effect, he said later. People hit with a Taser don't usually remain on their feet for long.

Stuckey fetched a broom handle while Roberson reloaded. The second Taser shot also proved ineffective. (Stuckey's autopsy report indicated that the Taser prongs never pierced her skin.)

Roberson said he watched her reach for a shiny object and realized that it was a knife. Roberson claimed that she had her arm cocked as though she were preparing to throw it at him. He was wearing riot gear but told investigators that he felt threatened.

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