Weapons inspectors pay a visit to Kansas City.

What They Did On Their Winter Vacation 

Weapons inspectors pay a visit to Kansas City.

It was cold and sunny last Friday as Danny McGuire waited in the St. Elizabeth parking lot at 75th and Main for his fellow weapons inspectors.

"Maybe they got detained," the Eagle Scout and Penn Valley freshman said dejectedly. Eventually two people showed up: Sue Wilson, a middle-aged Johnson Countian fresh from her first anti-war vigil at the J.C. Nichols Fountain the Sunday before, and Wil Robinson, a tailgunner on 26 World War II bombing missions who said George Bush inspired him to take this morning's assignment.

Fueled by Lamar's doughnuts, the three took off in a station wagon with a United Nations flag fluttering out the back window. Shortly, they arrived at the concrete-walled Federal Complex at Troost and Bannister Road.

The team was intent on visiting Honeywell's operations at the Department of Defense. Armed with foreign newspaper articles from early December listing Honeywell among several U.S. companies that had supplied nuclear and missile technology to Iraq, they pulled on hard hats and blue allergy masks and stood on the lawn. McGuire phoned a receptionist.

"You don't have anyone who can confirm or deny that Honeywell has supplied rocket technology to Iraq?" he asked.

Unable to gain entry -- or unwilling to drive inside and park in a visitor space -- the inspectors held up anti-war signs for cars passing on Bannister Road.

Eventually three Federal Protection Services officers arrived.

"I'm Inspector Dan," McGuire said. "Our concern is that Honeywell supplied Iraq with rocket technology, which will be used to kill American soldiers. We want peace."

"OK," said one officer.

"All right," said another.

"Why don't you go to the Honeywell entrance?" said Lieutenant Colonel Bobby Deitch. "It's the next one down."

Inspector Dan was undeterred. "I declare this site noncompliant and in material breach of our resolution," he said.

Later he declared the morning a success. "I think we raised the awareness of those three policemen and that receptionist," he noted dryly. His report earned cheers at the J.C. Nichols Fountain the following Sunday. And unlike similarly futile weapons inspections going on elsewhere, at least this one was fun.

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